Answered: Letter from Birmingham Jail

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November 11, 2022
Knowledge Check Module 8
November 11, 2022
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Answered: Letter from Birmingham Jail

Paraphrasing Letter from Birmingham Jail
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Option #1: Paraphrasing Activity – “Letter from a Birmingham Jail”
For this assignment, you will use Martin Luther King’s “Letter from a Birmingham Jail” to help you practice the important rhetorical skill of paraphrasing:
King, Jr., M. L. (1963, April 16). Letter from a Birmingham jail. The Martin Luther King, Jr. Research and Education Institute. http://okra.stanford.edu/transcription/document_images/undecided/630416-019.pdf
Be sure to address the following:
State the purpose of the letter. Be sure to paraphrase the speech throughout your analysis.
Describe one strategy for development of the letter. This should be one that you identify with or think is effective.
Remember that your paraphrase should end up being about the same amount of words as the original material that you cite. Please note that you are not paraphrasing the entire document but more like a sentence or two. This is similar to what you might do with a quote, but with your own words. A paraphrase is not the same as a summary.
Explain why you think the strategy is effectively used in the letter.
Incorporate at least one quote from the speech and properly cite the quote on the References page.
Explain how you plan to use this development strategy in your Portfolio Project.
You must accurately insert a quote and paraphrase in your analysis to provide in-text evidence from the essay or article you selected, and you must comment on the quote to demonstrate you are thinking in a critical manner.
Your written paper should be 2-3 pages in length, not counting the title and reference pages, and conform to APA guidelines in the CSU Global Writing Center. Include at least two scholarly references in addition to the course textbook. The CSU Global Library is a good place to find these references.
 
Answered: Letter from a Birmingham Jail
Letter from a Birmingham Jail
Author’s Name
Institutional Affiliation
 
Letter from a Birmingham Jail
After being arrested with staging illegal protests, Martin Luther King wrote the correspondence letter known as the letter from a Birmingham jail. Due to the differences in the manner Martin Luther King called for equality, there rose a misunderstanding with the ruling powers of that time. The clergymen made an effort and formatted a letter for the activities showcasing the in the appropriateness of his methods of calling for the equality. The essay is focused on paraphrasing the message that Dr King wrote in response to his critics. The piece was taking a descriptive approach when rewriting the letter; this will include partial sections of the letter to improve readers understanding. The reason behind the selection of the strategy is to ensure leaders understand the content of the letter.
First, the author confirms to the critics that he declines to respond to critics. However, he has gained effort to respond to the critics shown to his Birmingham efforts (advocating for equality between the blacks and whites). Martin claims that the critics were of good will. Thus, it is essential to retaliate. The response is composed of sound words that would help the critic’s sentiment his concerns.  Luther King acknowledges that regardless of being an outsider, it is inappropriate to assume injustices in the neighbourhood. Martin suggests that there is a need for communities to remain united; therefore, injustice in one state would affect the others.
The author notes that the process that the protestors passed before making the protesting public. The letter claims the protests realized Birmingham took part in racial segregation. Although the SCLC (Southern Christina Leadership Conference) requested the business owners in Birmingham to remove the racist signs they declined, an action that led to SCLC taking actions.  The letter highlights that the protests have postponed the protests while analyzing whether they were ready to suffer the consequences.  The members took self-purification and postponed the protests until “Eugene Connor was defeated in mayoral elections.
The response claims that non-violent protest was a form of negotiation. Martin Luther King agrees that the oppressors would not but the idea and will stop oppressing people. Therefore, it is important for the protests to create tension that would drive the oppressors into negotiations with the victims.  However, Dr King agrees with the white moderator’s approach that would find the action extreme, where tension is associated with “constructive and non-violent.” The author claims that in regards to time, the beneficiaries are subject to resisting change to maintain the status quo.
Next, Luther showcases the paradox where individuals are encouraged to follow the rules, and contrastingly being asked to break the same law. The author explains his understanding of just and unjust laws to defend his argument. For instance, the use “Parading without a permit.” According to Martin Luther King, “citizens are denied the privilege to enjoy the law when they are restrained from the First Amendment (freedom to conduct peaceful protest” (King Jr., 1963). The author claims the opportunity to help the Jews during Hitler’s time prevailed; he would do it even though it is illegal. The author defends himself against the accusations that refer him as an extremist. Luther confirms that his position is not based on any side, the author states that he is trying to force changes that would drive change. The later portion of the letter, Dr King, reflects on the situation claiming that there are possibilities for a change seeing that the blacks have survived situations like slavery. Dr King recognizes the clergy’s appreciation of the police (since the protestors were handled non-violently. The author is annoyed by the clergy’s failure to acknowledge the efforts of the protestors and ends the letter by including overstatement meant to be contained in the letter.
 
Reference
King Jr., M. L. (1963). Letter from Birmingham jail. Retrieved from http://www.africa.upenn.edu/Articles_Gen/Letter_Birmingham.html
http://okra.stanford.edu/transcription/document_images/undecided/630416-019.pdf

 

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